Common Scams that Target Small Businesses
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Common Scams that Target Small Businesses

By CIOReview | Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Tech support scams begin with a call or an alarming pop-up message claiming to be from a well-known company and informing one that their computer security is compromised. Their purpose is to gain money, computer access, or both.

FREMONT, CA: If one runs a small company or works for a non-profit, you put in a lot of time and effort to ensure that everything runs smoothly. However, when scammers target the business, it can damage the credibility and the bottom line. So, what is the safest way to defend oneself? Learn how to spot business-related scams. Some common scams that target small business include:

Fake Invoices

Scammers produce fake invoices that appear to be for products or services that the company uses, such as office or cleaning supplies or domain name registrations. Fraudsters hope that the individual who pays the bills may mistakenly believe that the invoices are for items that the company has ordered. Scammers know that if the invoice is for anything important, such as keeping the website up and running, one would definitely pay first and inquire later. Except that it is just a ploy, and if one pays, the money will vanish.

Unordered Office Materials and Other Products

Someone calls to check an address, confirm a current order of office supplies or other merchandise, or give a free catalog or sample. If one says yes, they will be shocked when unordered merchandise arrives at the door, along with high-pressure requests to pay for it. If anyone does not pay, the scammer can play a tape of a previous call as ‘proof’ that the order was put. Remember, if one receives not requested products, they have the legal right to keep it for free.

Tech Support Scams

Tech support scams begin with a call or an alarming pop-up message claiming to be from a well-known company and informing one that their computer security is compromised. Their purpose is to gain money, computer access, or both. They may ask to pay them to fix a problem one does not have, or they may attempt to enroll the company in a non-existent or unsuccessful computer maintenance program. They might also have access to confidential information such as passwords, customer records, or credit card numbers.