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How Cloud's GDPR Readiness Changes Business?

By CIOReview | Monday, December 21, 2020

FREMONT, CA: Companies of all size and shape around Europe are reviewing the changes issued by the GDPR and identifying the organisational and technical implications specific to them. A vital indicator of GDPR readiness is the data security mindset within enterprises and the level of protection offered, which means considerations regarding what, where, and how the business operates on cloud infrastructures. As a result, cloud computing raises many questions in the context of the GDPR. Today, corporate decision-makers and security experts are hasting to know what regulations mean for their cloud infrastructure and how can they be GDPR-ready.

If an enterprise is working with a cloud service provider, both the entities need to ensure in full compliance with GDPR. For this, enterprises primarily need to read through the terms and conditions to understand what providers are offering and what they expect the company to do. This will help firms understand where their responsibilities lie. It is possible that the current provider cannot offer the kind of security the firm needs to remain compliant. In this case, the firm might need to work with another.

Even if enterprises have had assurances from their cloud service providers that they are GDPR-compliant, it is important to prepare to be confident. Ultimately, firms themselves are responsible for their GDPR compliance. Given that, working with specialists in the industry to ensure compliance is a necessary step while walking towards GDPR-readiness. Additionally, GDPR recommends the inclusion of breach notification obligations in all data processing contracts between cloud computing companies and clients. So, organisations must make sure that all procedures to get notified breach events are clearly defined.

The fines imposed against those that fail to comply with GDPR are no doubt exorbitant. Since compliance has become mandatory for all businesses, companies are spending sleepless nights, planning their strategy to ensure that they are GDPR-ready.