In the realm of policing and law enforcement, these are the 5 biggest tech trends
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In the realm of policing and law enforcement, these are the 5 biggest tech trends

By CIOReview | Friday, January 20, 2023

Digital twins are computer models of real-world objects, systems, and processes. With IoT technology and sensors, a twin is informed by data, and can accurately simulate whatever it is modeled after.

Fremont, CA: The future of crime fighting is being shaped by many of the same technologies that are revolutionizing other fields, including business. Police departments are embracing AI, automation, big data, extended reality, and all the other trends we identify across other industries.

Smart device data

It is estimated that the amount of data generated is exploding, and a lot of that data may be useful in the fight against crime. Video doorbells and voice assistants that can capture incidental activity are increasingly becoming valuable sources of intelligence for police and detectives searching for evidence thanks to the Internet of Things (IoT).

Computer vision

There are several significant uses of computer vision in policing. It is most commonly used for automatic license plate recognition (ALPR), which identifies vehicles and their drivers with the help of cameras. Another controversial application is facial recognition, which was found to be unlawfully used by one police force in the UK. Because racial and gender bias was not considered, it was used "indiscriminately".

Robotics

Since robots can enter dangerous situations, they are clearly useful in law enforcement. Although society and technology aren't quite ready for a Robocop, autonomous, mobile units will become increasingly important in a variety of specialized roles.

Among them is disposing of bombs, suspicious packages, and other potentially dangerous items. 

Digital twins

Digital twins are computer models of real-world objects, systems, and processes. With IoT technology and sensors, a twin is informed by data, and can accurately simulate whatever it is modeled after. Guangdong, China, has developed a map showing incidents as they happen, public interactions, calls, and police resources used.

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Our field is already seeing the potential of VR and AR for helping police officers train and does their jobs each day. According to Axom, one of their systems is designed to train police in de-escalation of possible violent situations, as well as dealing with individuals with neurological issues such as hearing impairment or Alzheimer's.